The disregard of chinese companies for the laws of the government and the human rights of workers

In one of the most recent of these grim incidents as reported in the media, workers of a Chinese owned company, Linda Manufacturing Company in Agege, Lagos which produces weave-ons staged a peaceful protest to the State House of Assembly over the death of their colleague, Nnamdi Solomon while on duty. They alleged that the deceased had complained to the management that he was having stomach ache and should be permitted to go and get treatment but was denied until he died later that day in the company premises. The protesting workers were angrier because the management dumped dead body of their colleague, Nnamdi in a gutter within the factory premises for two days! They further reported that the company, which employs mostly casual staff, has been exploiting their workers for years.

The disregard of chinese companies for the laws of the government and the human rights of workers

The UK government has been urged to bring up concerns during a state visit by the Chinese president.

The disregard of chinese companies for the laws of the government and the human rights of workers

But what are the main issues? Harassment of activists and dissidents Human rights campaigners say that China continues to target activists and their family members with harassment, imprisonment and torture. The government has frequently imprisoned people who have spoken about politically sensitive topics.

In July, there was a crackdown on lawyers who worked on cases involving free speech and abuses of power. Amnesty International says that lawyers and activists have been targeted since July. One of the best known, Li Heping, is still missing.

Amnesty says there needs to be more awareness of cases such as that of Cao Shunlia human rights activist who died in police detention last year. Her family said that she had been denied medical attention and that they had been refused access to her body. More recently, a group of feminist activists were detained as they prepared to hand out leaflets and stickers about domestic violence.

Five of the women were detained for more than a month. Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo also continues his year jail term for subversion.

There have repeated called from other countries for his release. But the Chinese government has responded by saying that it is for China to decide and that "only the 1.

China is often accused of heavy-handed tactics against protesters.

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There have been complaints over the aggressive handling of large pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong last year.

Amnesty says that eight people remained in detention in September. Persecution of people for religious beliefs Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Protestants pray at an underground church Religion is carefully controlled in China. Independent groups such as Protestant "house churches" are considered unlawful and can be raided, closed and their members detained.

Muslims in Xinjiang have also faced restrictions on their religious activities, including during Ramadan. The Falun Gong spiritual movement has been banned since and its members have been sent to labour camps and prisons, Amnesty notes. Hundreds have died in attacks over the past three years.

China said last year that the violence had forced it to launch a "year-long campaign against terrorism" and it has stepped up security in the region.

Tibet has also seen years of unrest. Human Rights Watch says that seven people set themselves on fire in Tibetan populated areas in in protest against repressive policies by the authorities. The total number of immolations since is The death penalty Amnesty says that there are more executions in China than the rest of the world combined.

There are no officially published statistics but activists believe that thousands are executed and sentenced to death there every year.

Torture People detained for political views, human rights activities or religious beliefs are at a "high risk" of torture in custody, says Human Rights Watch.

A report this year said that methods used include electrocution. There are frequent allegations of police officers using torture to extract confessions. This is despite a ruling by the Chinese Supreme Court that forbids using "freezing, starving, extreme heat, fire branding or extreme exhaustion" on suspects.

Activists say that calls for a proper investigation into events on 4 June have been ignored. Human Rights Watch says that discussions about it remained censored and that the truth of what happened is withheld from people in China.

Internet and media freedom Image copyright Getty Images There are tight restrictions on the press in China and several leading journalists have recently had criminal charges brought against them.The conference leaders also noted that Chinese companies imported their own workers and typically followed Chinese labor laws, which are less stringent than Bolivian labor laws; the government reportedly permitted flexibility in compliance with the national law.

Many of the Chinese owned companies in the country have been notorious for engaging in anti-labour practices such as casualisation and disregard for safety in the work environment and even human.

According to Chinese Human Rights Defenders (CHRD), central government rules require local officials to meet a quota of institutionalizing two out . Principal human rights problems reported were corruption, violence and discrimination against women and children, trafficking in persons, and abuses of foreign workers.

RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS Section 1 Respect for the Integrity of the Person, Including Freedom From. Human rights campaigners say that China continues to target activists and their family members with harassment, imprisonment and torture.

The government has frequently imprisoned people who have. Many of the Chinese owned companies in the country have been notorious for engaging in anti-labour practices such as casualisation and disregard for safety in the work environment and even human.

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